Komatsuzaki Group

Md Motaleb HOSSAIN

hteramoto Research Fellow
  1. Molecule & Life Nonlinear Sciences Laboratory, Research Center of Mathematics for Social Creativity, Research Institute for Electronic Science
Office:
Research Institute for Electronic Science, 5th floor, room 203
Mailing address:
Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Kita 20 Nishi 10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan
FAX:
(+81)11-706-9459
TEL:
(+81)11-706-9437
E-mail:

Research Interests

Collective migration of cells, a dynamic phenomenon, is one of the key factors of many biological processes such as wound-healing, fracture-healing, tissue development as well as various disease related processes like cancer metastasis etc [S. K. Schnyder et.al. Scientific Reports, 7: 5163 (2017)]. To investigate different types of underlying mechanisms and general structures of those biological phenomena, it is needed to model the collective motion of cells (i.e., cells displacement) along with the theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. Researcher developed some biophysical model to examine the general properties of multi-cellular migration. Dynamics of colloidal fluids, analogous to cell migration, are investigated by Nag et.al. [The journal of chemical physics 141, 104907 (2014)]. Yet, how individual cell behavior influences large-scale, multi-cell collective motion remains unclear. It may be obvious that, strong interactions exist among the cells during collective migration and some information may be transferred among them due to that interaction. One individual cell may directly influence the motions of other cells, which stimulates the researchers to investigate the leadership phenomena in the collective migration. In the light of these developed models, to further investigate the collective motion of cells, we would like to use the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) computed from finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) and information-theoretic metric, e.g., Transfer Entropy (TE), a measure of information flow between two random processes, originated from the concept of Shannon entropy.

Relevant publications

Presentation